Diamagnetism


Diamagnetism is a property of all materials. Any moving charge (i.e., orbital electrons) experiences a force in the presence of a magnetic field. Applying a magnetic field to a diamagnetic material changes the angular velocity of the orbital electrons and results in the generation of an internal magnetic field that is in opposition to the externally applied field (Lenz’s law). Quartz (SiO2) and water (H2O) are examples of diamagnetic materials. The diamagnetic contribution is generally insignificant in materials containing strong permanent magnetic moments.



Physical Principles


Examples of Diamagnetic minerals

Below is a table of magnetic susceptibilities (χ) of some common diamagnetic materials (after Dunlop & Özedemir, 1997[1] ).


Mineral
χ
(10-7 m3kg-1)
Quartz
-6.2
Orthoclase feldspar
-5.8
Calcite
-4.8
Fosterite
-3.9
Water
-9.0




References


  1. ^ Dunlop, D. J., and O. O¨ zdemir (1997), Rock Magnetism: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Cambridge Stud. Magn., vol. 3, Cambridge Univ. Press, New York.





Further Reading

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See Also


List of other relevant MagWiki pages.